Shrimp

Product Uses

Food Uses 1

Shrimp and prawns can be used in a variety of recipes ranging from soups to pastas, and can be eaten plain. Shrimp are popular among consumers for the variety of health benefits they offer. Shrimp have high concentrations of astaxanthin, a carotenoid that provides antioxidant support to both the nervous system and musculoskeletal system. Shrimp is also high in selenium and copper.

Non-Food Uses

Non-food uses could not be located for this product.

Food Product Codes

FDA Industry Code and General Industry Description 2

FDA Industry Code Description of Product
16 Crustaceans

HTS code(s) 3

HTS Code Description of Product
306160003 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) Less Than 33 Per Kg (15S), Stat Note 1
306160006 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 33-45 Per Kg (15-20S), Stat Note 1
306160009 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 46-55 Per Kg (21-25S), Stat Note 1
306160012 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 56-66 Per Kg (26-30S), Stat Note 1
306160015 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 67-88 Per Kg (31-40S), Stat Note 1
306160018 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 89-110 Per Kg (41-50S), Stat Note 1
306160021 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 111-132 Per Kg (51-60S), Stat Note 1
306160024 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 133-154 Per Kg (61-70S), Stat Note 1
306160027 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) More Than 154 Per Kg (70S), Stat Note 1
306160040 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns, Frozen, Peeled, Imported In Accordance With Statistical Note 1 To This Chapter
306170003 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) Less Than 33 Per Kg (15S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170006 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 33-45 Per Kg (15-20S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170009 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 46-55 Per Kg (21-25S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170012 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 56-66 Per Kg (26-30S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170015 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 67-88 Per Kg (31-40S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170018 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 89-110 Per Kg (41-50S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170021 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 111-132 Per Kg (51-60S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170024 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) 133-154 Per Kg (61-70S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170027 Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Frozen, Shell-On, Count Size (Headless Weight) More Than 154 Per Kg (70S), Stat Note 1, Nesoi
306170040 Shrimps And Prawns, Frozen, Peeled, Imported In Accordance With Statistical Note 1 To This Chapter, Other Than Cold-Water
306350000 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Live, Fresh Or Chilled
306350020 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Live, Fresh Or Chilled, Shell-On
306350040 Cold-Water Shrimps And Prawns (Pandalus Spp., Crangon Crangon), Fresh Or Chilled, Peeled
306360000 Shrimps And Prawns, Live, Fresh Or Chilled, Other Than Cold-Water
306360020 Shrimps And Prawns, Live, Fresh Or Chilled, Shell-On, Other Than Cold-Water
306360040 Shrimps And Prawns, Fresh Or Chilled, Peeled, Other Than Cold-Water
306950000 Shrimps And Prawns, Nesoi
306950020 Shrimps And Prawns, Shell-On, Nesoi
306950040 Shrimps And Prawns, Peeled, Nesoi
1605210500 Shrimp And Prawn Products Containing Fish Meat; Prepared Meals Not In Airtight Containers
1605211020 Shrimps And Prawns, Breaded, Frozen
1605211025 Shrimps And Prawns, Prepared, Frozen, Nesoi
1605211030 Shrimps And Prawns, Prepared Nesoi, Frozen
1605211045 Shrimps And Prawns, Prepared Or Preserved, Not In Airtight Containers, Nesoi
1605211050 Shrimps And Prawns, Prepared Or Preserved, Not In Airtight Containers, Nesoi
1605290500 Shrimp And Prawn Products Containing Fish Meat; Prepared Meals, In Airtight Containers
1605291010 Shrimps And Prawns, Frozen, In Airtight Containers
1605291025 Shrimps And Prawns, Frozen, In Airtight Containers
1605291040 Shrimps And Prawns, Prepared Or Preserved, In Airtight Containers, Nesoi
1605291045 Shrimps And Prawns, Not Frozen, In Airtight Containers, Nesoi

USDA NDB code(s) 4

USDA NDB Code Description of Product
15152 Crustaceans, shrimp, mixed species, canned
15150 Crustaceans, shrimp, mixed species, cooked, breaked and fried
15153 Crustaceans, shrimp, mixed species, imitation, made from surimi
15270 Crustaceans, shrimp, raw (not previously frozen)
15271 Crustaceans, shrimp, cooked (not previously frozen)
15149 Crustaceans, shrimp, mixed species, raw (may have been previously frozen)
15151 Crustaceans, shrimp, mixed species, cooked, moist heat (may have been previously frozen)

Standards and Grades

CODEX Standards 5

CODEX STAN 37-1991
Standard for Canned Shrimps or Prawns
1991

CODEX STAN 92-1981
Standard for Quick Frozen Shrimps or Prawns
1981

FDA Standard of Identity 6

§161.175 Frozen raw breaded shrimp.
(a) Frozen raw breaded shrimp is the food prepared by coating one of the optional forms of shrimp specified in paragraph (c) of this section with safe and suitable batter and breading ingredients as provided in paragraph (d) of this section. The food is frozen.

(b) The food tests not less than 50 percent of shrimp material as determined by the method prescribed in paragraph (g) of this section, except that if the shrimp are composite units the method prescribed in paragraph (h) of this section is used.

(c) The term shrimp means the tail portion of properly prepared shrimp of commercial species. Except for composite units, each shrimp unit is individually coated. The optional forms of shrimp are:

(1) Fantail or butterfly: Prepared by splitting the shrimp; the shrimp are peeled, except that tail fins remain attached and the shell segment immediately adjacent to the tail fins may be left attached.

(2) Butterfly, tail off: Prepared by splitting the shrimp; tail fins and all shell segments are removed.

(3) Round: Round shrimp, not split; the shrimp are peeled, except that tail fins remain attached and the shell segment immediately adjacent to the tail fins may be left attached.

(4) Round, tail off: Round shrimp, not split; tail fins and all shell segments are removed.

(5) Pieces: Each unit consists of a piece or a part of a shrimp; tail fins and all shell segments are removed.

(6) Composite units: Each unit consists of two or more whole shrimp or pieces of shrimp, or both, formed and pressed into composite units prior to coating; tail fins and all shell segments are removed; large composite units, prior to coating, may be cut into smaller units.

(d) The batter and breading ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are the fluid constituents and the solid constituents of the coating around the shrimp. These ingredients consist of suitable substances which are not food additives as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or if they are food additives as so defined, they are used in conformity with regulations established pursuant to section 409 of the act. Batter and breading ingredients that perform a useful function are regarded as suitable, except that artificial flavorings, artificial sweeteners, artificial colors, and chemical preservatives, other than those provided for in this paragraph, are not suitable ingredients of frozen raw breaded shrimp. Chemical preservatives that are suitable are:

(1) Ascorbic acid, which may be used in a quantity sufficient to retard development of dark spots on the shrimp; and

(2) The antioxidant preservatives listed in subpart D of part 182 of this chapter that may be used to retard development of rancidity of the fat content of the food, in amounts within the limits prescribed by that section.

(e) The label shall name the food, as prepared from each of the optional forms of shrimp specified in paragraph (c) (1) to (6), inclusive, of this section, and following the numbered sequence of such subparagraph, as follows:

(1) “Breaded fantail shrimp.” The word “butterfly” may be used in lieu of “fantail” in the name.

(2) “Breaded butterfly shrimp, tail off.”

(3) “Breaded round shrimp.”

(4) “Breaded round shrimp, tail off.”

(5) “Breaded shrimp pieces.”

(6) Composite units:

(i) If the composite units are in a shape similar to that of breaded fish sticks the name is “Breaded shrimp sticks”; if they are in the shape of meat cutlets, the name is “Breaded shrimp cutlets”.

(ii) If prepared in a shape other than that of sticks or cutlets, the name is “Breaded shrimp ___”, the blank to be filled in with the word or phrase that accurately describes the shape, but which is not misleading.

In the case of the names specified in paragraphs (e) (1) through (5) of this section, the words in each name may be arranged in any order, provided they are so arranged as to be accurately descriptive of the food. The word “prawns” may be added in parentheses immediately after the word “shrimp” in the name of the food if the shrimp are of large size; for example, “Fantail breaded shrimp (prawns)”. If the shrimp are from a single geographical area, the adjectival designation of that area may appear as part of the name; for example, “Breaded Alaskan shrimp sticks”.

(f) The names of the optional ingredients used, as provided for in paragraph (d) of this section, shall be listed on the principal display panel or panels of the label with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render them likely to be read and understood by the ordinary individual under customary conditions of purchase. If a spice that also imparts color is used, it shall be designated as “spice and coloring”, unless the spice is designated by its specific name. If ascorbic acid is used to retard development of dark spots on the shrimp, it shall be designated as “Ascorbic acid added as a preservative” or “Ascorbic acid added to retard discoloration of shrimp”. If any other antioxidant preservative, as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, is used, such preservative shall be designated by its common name followed by the statement “Added as a preservative”.

(g) The method for determining percentage of shrimp material for those forms specified in paragraphs (c) (1) through (5) of this section is as follows:

(1) Equipment needed. (i) Two-gallon container, approximately 9 inches in diameter.

(ii) Two-vaned wooden paddle, each vane measuring approximately 13⁄4 inches by 33⁄4 inches.

(iii) Stirring device capable of rotating the wooden paddle at 120 r.p.m.

(iv) Balance accurate to 0.01 ounce (or 0.1 gram).

(v) U.S. Standard Sieve No. 20, 30.5 centimeter (12 inch) diameter. The sieves shall comply with the specifications for such cloth set forth in “Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists” (AOAC), 13th Ed. (1980), Table 1, “Nominal Dimensions of Standard Test Sieves (U.S.A. Standard Series),” under the heading “Definitions of Terms and Explanatory Notes,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be obtained from the AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick Ave., suite 500, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, or may be examined at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

(vi) U.S. Standard sieve, 1⁄2 -inch sieve opening, 12-inch diameter.

(vii) Forceps, blunt points.

(viii) Shallow baking pans.

(ix) Rubber-tipped glass stirring rod.

(2) Procedure. (i) Weigh the sample to be debreaded. Fill the container three-fourths full of water at 70°-80 °F. Suspend the paddle in the container, leaving a clearance of at least 5 inches below the paddle vanes, and adjust speed to 120 r.p.m. Add shrimp and stir for 10 minutes. Stack the sieves, the 1⁄2 -inch mesh over the No. 20, and pour the contents of the container onto them. Set the sieves under a faucet, preferably with spray attached, and rinse shrimp with no rubbing of flesh, being careful to keep all rinsings over the sieves and not having the stream of water hit the shrimp on the sieve directly. Lay the shrimp out singly on the sieve as rinsed. Inspect each shrimp and use the rubber-tipped rod and the spray to remove the breading material that may remain on any of them, being careful to avoid undue pressure or rubbing, and return each shrimp to the sieve. Remove the top sieve and drain on a slope for 2 minutes, then remove the shrimp to weighing pan. Rinse contents of the No. 20 sieve onto a flat pan and collect any particles other than breading (i.e., flesh and tail fins) and add to shrimp on balance pan and weigh.

(ii) Calculate percent shrimp material:

Percent shrimp material = (Weight of debreaded sample) / (Weight of sample) × 100 + 2
(h) The method for determining percentage of shrimp material for composite units, specified in paragraph (c)(6) of this section, is as follows:

(1) Equipment needed. (i) Water bath (for example a 3-liter to 4-liter beaker).

(ii) Balance accurate to 0.1 gram.

(iii) Clip tongs of wire, plastic, or glass.

(iv) Stop-watch or regular watch readable to a second.

(v) Paper towels.

(vi) Spatula, 4-inch blade with rounded tip.

(vii) Nut picker.

(viii) Thermometer (immersion type) accurate to ±2 °F.

(ix) Copper sulfate crystals (CuSo4·5H2O).

(2) Procedure. (i) Weigh all composite units in the sample while they are still hard frozen.

(ii) Place each composite unit individually in a water bath that is maintained at 63 °F-86 °F, and allow to remain until the breading becomes soft and can easily be removed from the still frozen shrimp material (between 10 seconds to 80 seconds for composite units held in storage at 0 °F). If the composite units were prepared using batters that are difficult to remove after one dipping, redip them for up to 5 seconds after the initial debreading and remove residual batter materials.

Note: Several preliminary trials may be necessary to determine the exact dip time required for “debreading” the composite units in a sample. For these trials only, a saturated solution of copper sulfate (1 pound of copper sulfate in 2 liters of tap water) is necessary. The correct dip time is the minimum time of immersion in the copper sulfate solution required before the breading can easily be scraped off: Provided, That the “debreaded” units are still solidly frozen and only a slight trace of blue color is visible on the surface of the “debreaded” shrimp material.

(iii) Remove the unit from the bath; blot lightly with double thickness of paper toweling; and scrape off or pick out coating from the shrimp material with the spatula or nut picker.

(iv) Weigh all the “debreaded” shrimp material.

(v) Calculate the percentage of shrimp material in the sample, using the following formula:

Percent shrimp material = (Weight of debreaded shrimp sample) / Weight of sample × 100

(i) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.

[42 FR 14464, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 47 FR 11833, Mar. 19, 1982; 49 FR 10102, Mar. 19, 1984; 54 FR 24896, June 12, 1989; 58 FR 2884, Jan. 6, 1993; 63 FR 14035, Mar. 24, 1998]

USDA Grades 7

(A) US Grade A shrimp shall:
(1) Possess good flavor and odor characteristics of the species being evaluated in accordance with grade determination of this subpart.
(2) Comply with the limits for defects for US Grade A quality in accordance with Grade Determination of this subpart.

(B) US Grade B shrimp shall:
(1) Possess reasonably good flavor and odor characteristics of the species being evaluated in accordance with grade determination of this subpart.
(2) Comply with the limits for defect for the US Grade B quality in accordance with Grade Determination of this subpart.

Consumption, Production and Trade

Estimated Consumption of Shrimp in the United States per capita 2004 - 2013 8

Annual Value of Shrimp Production in the United States 8

Annual Quantity of Shrimp Produced in the United States 9

Total quantity from top 10 species of shrimp.

United States Import Patterns 10

Imports of shrimp & prawns hits their peak in mid-October, followed by a slight decline through the end of December. Imports are at their middle ground starting the year in January where they continue to decline through mid-February, where they hit their lowest spot. From mid-February through October, imports on average steadily increase. However, in some year there are a few increases and decreases along the way from February through October given market conditions.

Monthly Imports of Shrimp into the United States 10

Data pulled using FAS category "Shrimp".

US Imports and Exports by Value 10

Data pulled using FAS category "Shrimp".

US Imports and Exports by Quantity 10

Data pulled using FAS category "Shrimp".

Top 5 Producing Countries of Shrimp 9

Country Metric Tons
China 1,935,223
Indonesia 676,582
Viet Nam 540,635
India 485,206
Thailand 362,687

Takes into account the top 10 species of shrimp.

Top 5 Exporting Countries of Shrimp 11

Country Metric Tons
Thailand 394,370
Viet Nam 362,028
China 305,205
India 262,011
Ecuador 188,097

Historic Global Production of Shrimp 9

Historic Global Value of Shrimp

Active anti-dumping/countervailing duties 12

Based on the list of antidumping and countervailing duty orders current as of April 28, 2016, there is an active antidumping duty for shrimp imported from Brazil, China, India, Thailand and Vietnam.

.02/01/2005 Frozen warm-water shrimp and prawns Brazil China India Thailand Vietnam 76 FR 23972

Processing and Supply Chain Characteristics

Seasonality Profile 13

Whiteleg Shrimp are native to the Eastern Pacific coast in water temperatures above 20 degrees Celsius, in tropical marine habitats. Males and females mature around the age of 6-7 months. Hatching occurs about 16 hours after spawning and fertilization.

Giant Tiger Prawn are found in tropical marine habitats. Adults are found over muddy sand or sandy bottoms at a depth of 20-50 meters in offshore waters. Both mating and spawning occur at night and there are five stages in ovarian maturation for the female including: undeveloped, developing, nearly ripe, ripe, and spent. Hatching occurs 12-15 hours after fertilization.

Both of these species are also farmed through a variety of different methods.

Supply Chain Characteristics 14

Following the catch of the shrimp, they must be handled quickly to avoid any spoilage due to sun and wind on deck. The catch is first sorted, or culled. Other fish, along with dead and damaged shrimp and rubbish are removed. The shrimp are then washed using sea water to remove any remaining mud or sand, and to reduce bacterial contamination. Then the shrimp are drained as much as possible before they move onto further processing, which can include freezing, cooking, or chilling. After being processed the shrimp are then ready to be transported for export or final use.

Way Exported 14

While at sea, shrimp can be stored at 2kg shrimp per one liter of water. When it is packed and transported on shore, unfrozen shrimp is stored between 500-890 kg per 1000 liters, depending on if it is whole or just the meats. Frozen shrimp is stored at about 360-440 kg per 1000 liters, also depending on whether it is whole or meats only.

Shipping pattern into US

No typical shipping patterns into US were located for this product.

N/A

Typical Packaging 14

Individually quick frozen shrimp for sale to caterers and retailers are typically weighed into flexible film bags, sealed, and packed into fiberboard cartons for storage and distribution. The film used for the packaging should have a high resistance to the passage of water vapor and oxygen, so not to dehydrate the shrimp. If the product is glazed, it is also recommended to vacuum pack the bag for added protection.

Food Safety and Defense

Typical Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) 15

Hazard Common Controls Production/Processing Step
Biological: Pathogen survival (Listeria) Cooking thoroughly and employee training. Cooking (steam)
Biological: Pathogen growth and toxin formation (Staphylococcus) Control process speed to ensure a rapid process (from cooking to freezing) Cleaning
Biological: Pathogen growth (Staphylococcus) Control process speed and ensure no processing delays Brining and draining

Key Activity Type - Coating/Mixing/Grinding/Rework 16

Yes - coating (glazing)

Key Activity Type - Ingredient Staging/Prep/Addition 16

No

Key Activity Type - Liquid Receiving/Loading 16

No

Key Activity Type - Liquid Storage/Hold/Surge Tanks 16

No

Recall history 17

Since 2011, there have been a total of 13 recall cases involving shrimp, seven of which involved Listeria monocytogenes, mainly in prepared products. There were also incidents of contamination with foreign materials, undeclared sulfites, undeclared eggs, undeclared soy, and salmonella.

Foodborne illness pathogens 18

Salmonella, Vibrio amd listeria monocytogenes can be found in shrimp products.

List of past EMA adulterants 19

Transhipped shrimp, saccharin, sodium hydroxide, sodium tripolyphosphate, gelatin, whiteleg shrimp, banded coral shrimp, malachite green, enroflaxacin

Current issues 20

There have been recent investigations on slave labor used in shrimp production that ends up in the global supply chain. In Indonesia, workers were locked in cages to be used as labor to catch shrimp that ends up in retailers including Kroger, Safeway, and Walmart. This shrimp is also being used in other markets, such as the cat food market or as calamari in fine dining or imitation crab in sushi. The extreme conditions, work hours, and abuse to these slaves has been in the news since 2015.

Food Defense Incidents (2017) 21

Type of incident
EMA
Number of illnesses
0
Number of deaths
0
Year Began
1988
Year Ended
1992
Incident summary
Robert Randazzo, president of New England Shrimp Co. was convicted of selling shrimp that had been illegally treated with saccharin and other chemicals to customers throughout the United States. Shrimp was treated with STP to absorb water and increase the weight of the shrimp, leading to increased profits. Also, Randazzo used sodium hydroxide, also known as soda lye and caustic soda, to turn white and Black Tiger shrimp imported from China, Thailand and other countries into pink shrimp appearing to be from the Gulf of Mexico in order to meet customer preference for pink shrimp from the United States. Further, Randazzo treated shrimp with saccharin to cover-up the undesirable taste created by excessive use of salt in its shrimp to increase the shrimp's weight. He did not label the package accordingly, which is illegal.
Adulterated food product(s)
shrimp
Affected food product(s)
crustaceans
Originated location(s)
United States, China
Harm location(s)
United States
Type of incident
EMA
Number of illnesses
0
Number of deaths
0
Year Began
2001
Year Ended
2002
Incident summary
Shrimp contaminated with chloramphenicol was found on an Asian shrimp ship near Louisiana. Chloramphenicol is an antibiotic used in shrimp to prevent disease outbreaks in overpopulated conditions. A Louisiana shrimper notified the agricultural commissioner who then inspected imported shrimp being sold at local grocery stores. No illnesses or deaths were reported.
Adulterated food product(s)
shrimp
Affected food product(s)
crustaceans
Originated location(s)
Harm location(s)
United States
Type of incident
EMA
Number of illnesses
0
Number of deaths
0
Year Began
2010
Year Ended
2010
Incident summary
Northern Fisheries, Ltd. and Shifco, Inc. were convicted of conspiring to mislabel imported fish, which is a violation of The Lacey Act and the Food Drug and Cosmetic act. The scheme involved the repackaging of 1,500 pounds of frozen chum Salmon fillets from China relabeled and sold as product of Russia. In addition, shrimp with an estimated retail value of $250,000 to $1,000,000 from Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia were relabeled as product of more desirable Panama, Ecuador, and Honduras. Shrimp and fish coming from Asia has higher tariffs than coming from the Americas and Russia. Prosecutions followed an investigation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Adulterated food product(s)
salmon, shrimp
Affected food product(s)
crustaceans, Fish
Originated location(s)
China, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia
Harm location(s)
United States
Type of incident
EMA
Number of illnesses
0
Number of deaths
0
Year Began
2006
Year Ended
2007
Incident summary
Melamine was found in shrimp feed being used as a binding agent in Ohio. No illnesses or deaths were reported. Melamine was banned in pet food due to its harmful effects, and it is unlikely that the company producing the feed was unaware of the ban. Uniscope, a distributor of the adulterated product, alerted the FDA that they had found melamine in feed products during regular testing.
Adulterated food product(s)
Shrimp Feed
Affected food product(s)
Shrimp Feed
Originated location(s)
United States
Harm location(s)
United States
Type of incident
EMA
Number of illnesses
0
Number of deaths
0
Year Began
2007
Year Ended
2007
Incident summary
In June 2002 in Taiwan, a 20-ton shipment of frozen white shrimp imported from China contained Enrofloxacin, an illegal antibiotic in animal husbandry and fish farming. According to the Department of Health (DOH), most of the shipment was imported by a local company in Taoyuan County and sold to consumers. Enrofloxacin is sometimes administered to prevent the reproduction of bacteria in humans and has never caused serious impacts on human health. However, the antibiotic could cause gastrointestinal discomfort, allergies, or the formation of crystals in the urinary tract. There are no reported illness and deaths from this incident.
Adulterated food product(s)
shrimp
Affected food product(s)
crustaceans
Originated location(s)
China
Harm location(s)
Taiwan

Sources

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